Our Wild Salmon Economy is worth so much more



Here in BC we have a world-class resource- the wild salmon. These fish are incredibly valuable and support many other economies including sports fishing lodges, whale watching, commercial fishing, first nations food and economy, grizzly bear watching, & eco tourism. Wild pink salmon may be one of the world’s cleanest proteins and healthiest food sources. Millions of these fish return to our rivers and streams without us having to do anything but let them be. We are essentially “trading” this incredible natural resource for an energy-consumptive, unsustainable industry that is severely impacting BC’s natural wealth of wild salmon.

 

As government protects corporate trade interests, the public bears the cost. By denying the existence of European viruses and allowing these feedlots to pour pathogens into the migration routes of the wild salmon, we are effectively killing our wild salmon economy. It’s a bad trade and it makes no economic sense

click image to read article

Sport angling a runaway leader in B.C.’s fishing and aquaculture sector

 

Recreational fishery dominates revenue generation, employment figures in new study



Ninety-eight percent of BC salmon feedlot industry is owned by three Norwegian multinational companies, while the wild salmon economy is comprised of hundreds of small businesses like saltwater and freshwater fishing charters, lodges, commercial fishing ventures, value-added salmon processing, first nation fishing, whale and bear-watching wilderness tourism.


Recent data confirm that local economic benefits from aquaculture simply pale in comparison to the industries it puts at risk.

 

For instance, in 2011, according to DFO and Stats BC, sport fishing produced revenues of $925 million, contributing $325 million to BC's GDP and 8,400 direct jobs. Compare that with the Norwegian-dominated aquaculture industry, which produced $469 million in revenues (that's for all aquaculture, of which salmon farms are only one component). Salmon farms specifically contributed just $8.5 million to our GDP.

 

Wild fish are worth eight times as much to the BC economy as Aquaculture (BC Stats, includes all aquaculture). The wild fisheries employ five times as many people and pay out five times as much in wages. As farmed salmon production has risen dramatically since 1990, the number of jobs has not changed (1,700 jobs). This means as the BC environment has paid the price of the industries impacts, the people of BC have not been the ones to benefit. Profits are exported to the shareholders of these Norwegian multinationals


By contrast, the province's $13.4 Billion tourism industry (up 44% since 2000) is built largely on BC's "Best Place on Earth" / "Supernatural BC" brand, which depends greatly on wild salmon and produces vastly more jobs than do salmon farms.

 

British Columbians have to ask why are we allowing the government to favor this foreign-owned industry, which is robbing British Columbian’s of our extraordinary natural food resource, economic powerhouse and legacy. It’s a heist in broad daylight.

 

Luckily there’s hope, scientific evidence strongly suggests that when feedlots are removed wild salmon survival rates increase immediately.

Salmon Farming value much lower than wild fish economy

 

The highly mechanized salmon feedlot industry is 95% Norwegian-owned by just three companies.

 

Marine Harvest

Grieg Seafood
   Cermaq (Mainstream)


This industry never made jobs.

2011 Gross Domestic Product 9- The value added to the economy (wages, profits, interest income, value of inventories, depreciation)

Wild fisheries Sport + Commercial .……..$536.7 million
   Aquaculture - ……………………………….$61.9 million

 

Wild fish are worth 8xs more to BC economy than aquaculture

 

2011 Employment
Sport fishing …….... 8,400
Aquaculture …........1,700 
Capture fishery….... 1,400 (declined 50% since salmon feedlots arrived)


Wild fisheries employ 5xs more people than aquaculture

 

2011 Wages
   Sport fishing ……... $218.9 million
   Capture Fishery .... $8.4 million in wages, $70 million in self-employed income
   Aquaculture …......…. $55.7 million


Wild fisheries provide 5xs more income to British Columbians

2011 Revenue
 includes cost of goods and services purchased from other industries

Sport fishing …….….. .$936.5 million
   Aquaculture …………...$469.0 million
   Capture Fishery …...... $344.8 million

 


Total Revenue:

Wilderness tourism (70% salmon-dependent) ……....…….$2.2 billion* 


Sport fishing …………………………………………………..........…...……$936.5 million
Aquaculture (Scallops, Oysters, salmon, etc.) .…………........................$469.0 million
Commercial fishing …………………………….…….……………….......….$344.8 million

* direct, indirect and induced

Wilderness tourism earns 4.7xs more than aquaculture

 

 

The Wilderness Tourism Association is asking government for help:


“… the WTABC wants the Province and the government of Canada to close or fallow the salmon farms on BC’s key salmon migratory routes such as in the Discovery Islands, the Broughton Archipelago, and Clayoquot Sound.” (March 27 Press Release)

 

 

 Taxpayers compensate salmon feedlot owners


Unlike other countries Canada compensates salmon feedlot corporations when they are asked to cull/kill their fishThis may be why the CFIA now allows them to grow and market ISA virus infected fish. 


We are not only risking our wild salmon, along with the food security, our salmon-based ecosystem and billions of dollars in economic activity, we are also paying hundreds of millions of dollars to subsidize a foreign-owned industry. While the government continues to cut funding for protection of wild fish stocks (slashing the Fisheries budget by $300 million.) they are giving $57 million to "to enhance regulatory certainty" in the aquaculture industry.

Salmon Farming Profits Exported

For Freshwater Sports Fishing Alone

click on image for report

 

 

In 2010 the direct economic impact was $546 million – contributing $164 millionin value added GDP and almost $94 million in wages and benefits.Not bad. But it gets better. When we add indirect and induced impacts,including $55 million in tax revenues, the total impact of freshwater fishingcame to $957 million in expenditures, GDP, salaries and wages and employment of 5,000 person years.*Businesses that cater directly to anglers include: tackle shops and retailsporting goods stores, boat dealerships, boat and equipment rentals, marinasand campgrounds, resorts and lodges, guides and fishing charters. Businesses that indirectly serve freshwater anglers include: restaurants, motels, gasstations, ferries and airlines.

The Economics of Salmon farming in BC

 

Read the Economics of Salmon Farming in BC by the Centre for Policy Alternatives.

 




Economics of Salmon Farming in BC
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Economics Salmon farming BC.pdf
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